Washington State University’s smelly corpse flower blooms for the first time

Washington State University’s smelly corpse flower blooms for the first time

Washington State University announced its corpse flower, a plant nicknamed after its signature stench, bloomed for the first time on the school’s Vancouver campus.

The plant, known scientifically as Titan arum, started its brief bloom this week and the school shared time-lapse video of the plant’s opening.

The university’s flower, dubbed Titan VanCoug, was planed by Associate Professor of Molecular Biosciences Steve Sylvester in 2002 using a seed from the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Titan arum plant, which is known as Big Bucky.

The school said this week’s bloom was the first for Titan VanCoug. The plants famously take years for their first bloom, but officials said the 17-year time period for Washington State’s plant was likely due to its corm cloning itself, causing it to have up to four leaves at a time instead of the standard one leaf.

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